Arts News Posts

Jake Gyllenhaal: Art Critic?

The actor is reportedly prepping for a role in a movie about the L.A. art scene. Read More

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Jens Hoffmann ‘Departing’ as Co-Artistic Director of Front Triennial in Cleveland

The curator is currently scheduled to organize biennials in Honolulu and Indianapolis. Read More

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Exhibition focuses on Julio González’s development from craftsman to artist

In 1928 Pablo Picasso (1881 – 1973) went to see his old friend and fellow Spaniard Julio González (1876 – 1942) in Paris. He needed the help of the talented metalworker to turn a two-dimensional design into a metal sculpture. It was to be the start of a close partnership and the continuation of a unique friendship. They worked together on a number of sculptures over a four-year period. For both artists, the collaboration provided a major push to further development. Thanks to González, Picasso discovered new modes of expression in sculpture and for González the collaboration was the final leg of his journey towards a distinctive artistic style. This exhibition at the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag focuses principally on González’s development from craftsman to avant-garde artist. With no fewer than 20 works by Picasso, it is also a celebration of the friendship between the two men. Julio González encountered metalworking at

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First exhibition on Impressionism in Southeast Asia shows how this influential art movement transformed painting

If the conservative art academy in 19th century Paris had its way, the only paintings recognised as masterpieces today might be the carefully composed and often theatrical paintings that characterised the schools of Neo-Classicism and Romanticism. However, in the 1860s, a group of young painters such as Claude Monet and Auguste Renoir began to challenge the status quo by taking a revolutionary approach to painting light and using colour – giving rise to one of the most recognisable and beloved art movements today: Impressionism. Inspired by the rapid technological innovations of the late 19th century, these Impressionists moved out of their studios to open air to capture the fleeting effects of light as it appeared before their eyes, using newly available pigments and discoveries in the science and theory of colour. To trace the development of the movement most closely identified with the emergence of the modern era, National Ga

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Exhibition presents Latin American art in dialogue with the MMK Collection

In one of its largest exhibitions ever the MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main is collaborating with the Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires (Moderno). The exhibition, A Tale of “Two Worlds: Experimental Latin American Art in Dialogue with the MMK Collection 1940s1980s”, is being presented throughout the MMK 1 between 25 November 2017 and 2 April 2018, and at the Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires between 7 July and 14 October 2018. The exhibition, jointly curated by Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires Director Victoria Noorthoorn and Senior Curator Javier Villa, and MMK Curator Klaus Görner, brings the masterworks of the Frankfurt collection into dialogue with key works of Latin American art. The exhibition accommodates some 500 artworks from private and public collections by 100 artists and collectives from Latin America, the United States and Europe and are displayed in Frankfurt on all levels of MMK 1

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Iranian photographer Shahrokh Hatami dead at 89

Famed Iranian photo-journalist Shahrokh Hatami, who covered front-page events from the revolution in his homeland to the Beatles in their early days has died aged 89. His partner, the actress Francine Carpon, told AFP Saturday he died from “pulmonary insufficiency at Auxi-le-Chateau” in northern France. Born in Tehran in 1928 and beginning life as a journalist for an Iranian newspaper, Hatami’s roving lens captured a huge variety of events as he let his camera tell the story from 1950. Over seven decades he captured a dizzying array of stories, providing notably for Life magazine the visual backdrop for the overthrow in 1953 of Iranian prime minister Mohammad Mossadegh in a US-sponsored coup. A quarter of a century later and he would be snapping dramatic images of the Iranian Revolution — he was on the plane which took the Ayatollah Khomeini back to Iran in February 1979. There was also plenty of room for tracking celebrities, not least the Beatles, whom he shot in Liverpool’s iconic

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Regrets, They’ve Had a Few: Top 200 Collectors Reflect on the Ones That Got Away

Memories of ill-fated Warhols, bypassed Basquiats, and eclipsed works by Koons linger. Read More

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World’s only particle accelerator dedicated to art revs up at the Louvre in Paris

The world’s only particle accelerator dedicated to art was switched on at the Louvre in Paris Thursday to help experts analyse ancient and precious works. The 37-metre (88-foot) AGLAE accelerator housed underneath the huge Paris museum will be now be used for the first time to routinely study and help authenticate paintings and other items made from organic materials. The Centre for Research and Restoration of the Museum of France (C2RMF) — which is independent of the Louvre — has spent 2.1 million euros ($2.5 million) overhauling and upgrading the machine, which can determine the chemical make-up of objects without the need to take samples. “Up to now we almost never analysed paintings because we were afraid the particle beam might change the colours” when it hit the pigments in the paint, director Isabelle Pallot-Frossard told AFP. The AGLAE works by speeding up helium and hydrogen nuclei to speeds of between

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Seeing with closed eyes: Konrad Fischer Galerie opens exhibition of works by Giuseppe Penone

In the past, Giuseppe Penone rubbed graphite directly onto walls in order to reveal their structure, the one left behind after the builder’s hand had smoothed the surface. This age-old skill, buried in the plasterwork and inherent to the material itself, is revealed in all its curious complexity: the criss-cross lines, a confusion of traces and concealed masses henceforward became visible.
 Following a similar approach, by drawing with graphite, Penone has meticulously copied the enlarged image of eyelids onto large sheets of paper, as well as onto the walls, in great detail: the lines and veins, the delicate skin and the marks of ageing; this fragile skin which, when closed, prevents the eye from projecting its gaze, turning its vision inwards and reducing the eye to darkness. Giuseppe Penone then precisely glued acacia thorns onto large canvases which in turn, side by side, reproduce the exact outline of the two eyelids. Placed either side of a marble plaque, we contemplate the

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Tate Modern opens the most comprehensive Modigliani exhibition ever held in the UK

This autumn, Tate Modern stages the most comprehensive Modigliani exhibition ever held in the UK, bringing together a dazzling range of his iconic portraits, sculptures and the largest ever group of nudes to be shown in this country. Although he died tragically young, Amedeo Modigliani (1884–1920) was a ground-breaking artist who pushed the boundaries of the art of his time. Including 100 works – many of them rarely exhibited and nearly 40 of which have never before been shown in the UK – the exhibition re-evaluates this familiar figure, looking afresh at the experimentation that shaped his career and made Modigliani one of the greatest artists of the twentieth century. A section devoted to Modigliani’s nudes, perhaps the best-known and most provocative of the artist’s works, are a major highlight. In these striking canvases Modigliani invented shocking new compositions that modernised figurative painting. His explicit depictions als

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Gold leaf from Napoleon’s crown fetches 625,000 euros

A gold laurel leaf removed from the crown Napoleon Bonaparte wore to his coronation sold for 625,000 ($735,000) euros at an auction in Paris on Sunday. The sale price far exceeded the estimate of between 100,000 and 150,000 euros, Osenat auction house said. The leaf was one of six cut from the crown ahead of the 1804 coronation, because the monarch considered it too heavy. The goldsmith Martin Guillaume Biennais gave the spare leaves to each of his daughters – with the auctioned gold carving having been passed through the family to present day. A leaf which was worn during the coronation but was later detached from the crown sold in the 1980s for 80,000 francs. Around 400 works dedicated to the French emperor were sold at Sunday’s auction, including a decorated box engraved with gold flowers, also made by Biennais, which belonged to Napoleon’s wife

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Zanele Muholi Awarded France’s Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres

She considers her photographs of members of the LGBTQI community a form of visual activism. Read More

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Exhibition at The Met Breuer features 43 of Edvard Munch’s landmark compositions

Although Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) attained notoriety early in his career for his haunting depictions of human anxiety and alienation that reflected modern experience, he believed that his artistic breakthrough occurred around 1913 at the age of 50.Throughout his career, Munch regularly revisited subjects from his earlier years, exploring them with renewed inspiration and intensity. Self Portrait: Between the Clock and the Bed (1940–43) was one of his final such works and it serves as a lens to reassess Munch’s oeuvre. On view at The Met Breuer, the exhibition Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed features 43 of the artist’s compositions created over a span of six decades, including 16 self-portraits and works that have never before been seen in the United States. The thematic arrangement of the exhibition reveals the frequency with which Munch revisited and reworked certain subjects. It presents him

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Christie’s to reveal first highlights from the Collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller in Hong Kong

Christie’s announces the first highlights from the collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller to be unveiled in Hong Kong on November 24, which marks the start of a global tour of collection highlights presented by private aviation company VistaJet. The collection will be offered for sale at Christie’s Rockefeller Center Galleries in New York in the Spring of 2018. The collection sale will be the most significant philanthropic auction ever presented, with all the Estate sale proceeds destined to benefit selected charities. The first highlights include masterpieces of Impressionist and Modern Art, including a Rose Period Picasso selected by Peggy and David Rockefeller from Gertrude Stein’s collection (estimate in the region of $70 million), Claude Monet’s Nymphéas en fleur, painted circa 1914-1917 (estimate in the region of $35 million), and a sumptuous 1923 reclining nude by Matisse that is poised to reset the a

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MoMA and Neue Galerie Jointly Acquire Self-Portrait by Paula Modersohn-Becker

The work will go on view tomorrow in MoMA’s permanent-collection galleries. Read More

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Alina Szapocznikow at Hepworth Wakefield, England

See images from one notable show every weekday. Read More

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Dali’s Mae West Lips sofa at risk of leaving the UK

Arts Minister John Glen has placed a temporary export bar on Mae West Lips Sofa, by Salvador Dalí and Edward James, to provide an opportunity to keep it in the country. The sofa is at risk of being exported from the UK unless a buyer can be found to match the asking price of £480,281.56 plus VAT. One of the most instantly recognisable pieces of furniture of the 20th century, the sofa was also a collaboration between Dalí, one of the century’s most important and influential artists and James, a key figure in the international recognition and promotion of Surrealism. The decorative elements of the sofa correspond to the decoration of the interior of Monkton House, West Sussex, which was originally designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens in 1902 for Edward James’s parents. As part of his renovation of the interior of the House in the mid-1930s, James was assisted by architects Christopher ‘Kit’ Nicholson and Hugh Casson, as well as decorator Norris Wakefield. Together they creat

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First retrospective at the Prado to be devoted to Mariano Fortuny opens in Madrid

Continuing the Museo del Prado’s strategy, launched some years ago, of reassessing the great masters of 19th-century Spanish painting, the Museum is now presenting the major exhibition Fortuny (1838-1874), sponsored by Fundación AXA and with the special collaboration of the Museo Fortuny in Venice and the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya. Devoted to one of the 19th-century Spanish artists who has enjoyed the most sustained reputation and greatest international fame, and a notable figure within Spanish art of all periods, the exhibition is on display in Rooms A and B of the Jerónimos Building from 21 November 2017 to 18 March 2018. While Mariano Fortuny has long been celebrated in the specialist literature and through the numerous exhibitions and different initiatives of varying quality and importance that have been devoted to him in recent decades, his stature as an artist and his profound roots in the most authent

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Becky Kolsrud at JTT, New York

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Major retrospective includes vast array of work from Robert Rauschenberg’s career

A fuse was lit in the 1953 art world when Robert Rauschenberg convinced artist Willem de Kooning to allow him to erase one of his drawings; fellow artist Jasper Johns executed the inscription within the frame: “ERASED DE KOONING DRAWING ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG 1953.” Now seen as a bombshell that shook the foundations of Abstract Expressionism, Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953) is an outstanding example of Rauschenberg’s irreverent yet incisive style, and it famously pushes the limits of what art can be. This special work was acquired by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art from Rauschenberg through a gift of Phyllis C. Wattis, an instrumental member of the board of trustees who befriended Rauschenberg late in her life. It now anchors the museum’s exceptional holdings of the artist’s early work and is a highlight in the West Coast exclusive of Robert Rauschenberg: Erasing the Rules, on view at SFMOMA from November

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Fashion giant Azzedine Alaia dies at 77

French-Tunisian designer Azzedine Alaia, whose timeless gowns won an army of devotees around the world, has died at the age of 77, his couture house said, sparking an outpouring of tributes from across the world. Alaia, who rose to fame in the 1980s, refused to march to the beat of international fashion weeks, releasing his collections in his own time with scant concern for publicity. Praise poured in online with designer Ines de la Fressange tweeting: “Small in stature but huge in the world. Adieu Azzedine Alaia.” Barbadian superstar Rihanna Instagrammed a picture of the designer kissing her at a dinner with the caption, “my dear ALAIA…. you will live on forever. rip.” “We have lost a designer of great talent. It is very sad news,” fellow creator Pierre Cardin told AFP. And Victoria Beckham tweeted: “A sad day… You were a true master and one of my biggest inspirations.” Alaia was born to a farming family in

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Curator Gavin Delahunty Resigns from Dallas Museum of Art, Citing ‘Allegations Regarding Inappropriate Behavior’ [UPDATED]

Curator Gavin Delahunty has resigned from the Dallas Museum of Art, citing “allegations regarding . . . inappropriate behavior.”Delahunty joined the museum as Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art in spring 2014 from Tate Liverpool, where he had served as … Read More

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